Adrian's Journey

Adrian's Journey

Genre: 
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
Pages: 
462
£7.69
ISBN:
9781786295712
30% Off paperbacks and hardbacks!
Join Adrian on his journey from easy-going teenager through to manhood, as he searches for his birth mother. Where is she? Why did she abandon him? Adrian's Journey begins with scenes in England from his comfortable family life and his activities with his fellow first year university students. But the focus moves inexorably to the twists and turns of Adrian's quest as he grapples with life's complexity, juggling its demands, and with his experiences in colourful and troubled Beirut. Adrian's Journey is not only a tale of a young man trying to discover the identity of his biological mother; it is also a reflection of the human condition, and of how people are shaped by their experiences in life. Readers may identify with the questions asked and the decisions made, yet the story is far from predictable in its course and outcome. Compelling yet familiar, Adrian's Journey will hold the reader's interest until the very last page.  
Cooper

Alison
Cooper

Alison Cooper started writing fiction at the age of 62, after a long career in academic research administration. Her final position before retirement was at the Leverhulme Trust where she worked for thirteen years. Her first novel, The Rapallo Legacy, was published in November 2009. Adrian's Journey is a story based loosely on the family circumstances of a friend, adapted and altered for the actions in the novel. Alison has a degree in Chinese and French, a working knowledge of Italian, and enough German and Spanish to read essential notices. In 1977-78 she spent nine months as a student in Beijing. Now living in London and Italy, she enjoys classical music and jazz, (in the past she played the timpani, the viola, and the piano, and even conducted a little), collecting Chinese stamps, ballroom and Latin dancing, and gardening, about which she knows very little.  

Reviews

by
Luhk Gwoh Loih
5
A mould-breaker, Nothing conforms to a standard pattern. Adrian is neither hero nor anti-hero. Things happen to him, and he instigates some of what happens, but the same can be said of other characters too. The less pleasant people are rarely that unpleasant and the goodies are not necessarily going to affect Adrian as the sentimental reader might wish them to. There is violence but it is not described so much as referred to; there is sex but not in order to titillate. What there is is a rich vein of character observation set in a surprisingly credible story-line which is always restrained even though it deals with potentially over-dramatic events. This is clever writing and makes an excellent read.
by
Peter Williams
4
Adrian’s Journey is Alison Cooper’s second book and deserves to be widely read (and, indeed, turned into a film). It is in essence a Quest Novel, with the young hero, Adrian, seeking the whereabouts of his biological mother Patti, who may or may not live in Beirut. The trials and tribulations faced by Adrian in his quest are told through a fast-paced and gripping narrative that takes the reader into the darker corners (literally) of the Middle Eastern conflict. He emerges sadder and wiser, but optimistic and well-prepared to take his place as a citizen in today’s complex international society. The book also has other quests to pursue. Adrian’s adoptive family, sympathetically drawn and in many ways admirable, strive to come to terms with his journey away from them and their slightly offbeat domesticity in rural Suffolk; his horizons are expanding and his experiences broaden the questions he asks about life, rather to their concern. Moreover, the novel starts as Adrian begins his undergraduate life at SOAS in 2000, registered on a course in Chinese (though he quickly gravitates towards Arabic). His group of friends in London provides him with a multi-national and multicultural social setting which creates its own convincing account of student lives and loves, hopes and fears, achievements and failures. These characters are strongly, if not deeply, drawn and offer (to this reader at least) an engaging counterpoint to the main thrust of the story, Adrian’s visits to Beirut, an ambiguous city of mystery, violence and moral confusion. There is much to enjoy in this book. The dialogue is generally convincing, if occasionally a little dated, even for 2000; the plots are skilfully constructed and intertwined; and the pages turn themselves. We want to know what happens next. I have one reservation: the book ends with a brief Epilogue which details the future CV of each key character. Although other reviewers have applauded this coda, I should have preferred the future to remain the future not least because, as with all good fiction, it is implicit in the characterisations that are developed in the body of the novel. While my advice is not to read the Epilogue, I’m sure few readers will want to resist it. But do read Adrian’s Journey - it’s a worthwhile destination.
by
Jackie
4
I enjoyed reading the book although it took a little time to really get into it. The author was observant and adept at writing her characters, their environments and interactions with one another. Her details of surroundings, personalities, clothing and food for example were clearly drawn. However, I feel certain parts at the beginning of the story were sometimes bland and not always necessary to the plot. As the pace developed her descriptions of life and people in Beirut and the traumas endured by Adrian in search of his birth-mother, and subsequently himself, were finely and sympathetically written. One felt involved with the characters and warmth towards Adrian as he developed and matured through his experiences into a courageous and likeable man.

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