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By: Stephen Cowey

A Briton's Complaint

Pages: 122 Ratings: 5.0
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The author takes you on a journey from Big Bang to Britain in the 21st century as seen through the eyes of a fish. He attempts to explain why so many of us are living lives of deceit, dissipation and depression. These days he is suspicious of anybody who is not depressed. Over the centuries, despite all the wonders of the arts and science, human nature has remained constant. Human nature must change if there is to be a future. If you think you are on the right side, the end always justifies the means. That is the real tragedy of humanity.

Stephen Cowey was born in Lower Early but when he was two years old his parents moved to the north east of Scotland where he attended school and university.
He then embarked on a career in the computer industry working first in sales and then, after further study, in technical support.
Desiring to broaden his horizons beyond these shores he moved to Stuttgart in 1992, spending six rewarding years learning a foreign language and culture whilst travelling throughout Europe.
He settled in Glasgow in 1999 where he still lives today.

Customer Reviews
5.0
1 reviews
1 reviews
  • Karen Williams

    This is a remarkable distillation of rhyming couplets, blank verse and prose covering the period from the beginning of existence to civilisation's potential end. A Briton's Complaint is didactic literature which uses tragedy to convey the important messages at its heart. Like Dante's Divine Comedy it contains political and historical elements as well as much philosophical musing. Interwoven in this structure is the perceived view of Britain by a physical and metaphorical fish.

    After the creation of the universe Section One develops the character of the fish, (or perhaps human Pisces) towards that of a legitimate leader who is nonetheless fatally flawed. After the ascent of man Section Two descends into the separation of the races of Great Britain according to tradition, blood, and eventually war. The unicorn appears in the minds of the invading English representing a sign that a grave transgression has been committed. This leads into Section Three which deals with the political and sociological state in which Britain finds itself today. Many pertinent issues are addressed including power, education, charity and privilege. The dehumanization of the people is mourned by a plethora of different agents.

    Throughout this work there is powerful, wonderfully descriptive writing and stanzas which could stand alone as great pieces of writing in themselves. It is definitely worth reading but you will need a dictionary handy as it will increase your vocabulary. Its only limitation is it assumes a high level of education and intellect.

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