Best Book Publishers UK | Austin Macauley Publishers

By: Jenny Brown

Angus The Angel And Ben’s Broken Family

Pages: 108 Ratings: 5.0
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“He smiled as he moved away in a shimmer of light and sparkling stars”
Ben’s world is turned upside down when he learns that his dad might be leaving. He goes with his best friend, Kirsty, and her big brown dog, Dancer, to their secret den in the forest, his favourite place in the whole wide world. This is where they meet Angus the Angel who shows them how to deal with fear by charging up their inner power. This has a magical effect on them both and Ben feels strong and happy again.
But not for long!
Ben hates hearing his parents arguing and loneliness makes things worse when Kirsty gets sick and he can’t see her.
How can he cope and when will he see Kirsty again?
Who can he talk to?
Is it true that the den is about to be destroyed by building work?
Could it be saved by a mystical secret he has discovered deep in the forest?
Most of all though how can he stop his dad from leaving?
Why does Angus not step in to help especially if he is a REAL angel?
Why is everything getting worse instead of better and why can’t things not go back to the way they used to be?
Everything is falling apart and Ben feels as if his beloved cat, Molly, is the only one in his family who cares about him. He feels lost, alone and afraid.

Jenny Brown’s career in childcare began in the Community Development Early Years sector, with later involvement in Home/School Support Services for primary school aged children and their families. Combining this background with training in holistic therapies, energy healing and meditation she later worked in a Glasgow inner-city stress centre where these techniques were used in local schools. She also trained as a counsellor for Childline Scotland. When working directly with individual children Jenny often used books and storytelling as tools, allowing children to explore their own fears and worries whilst reassuring and helping them in dealing with difficult situations.



Customer Reviews
5.0
8 reviews
8 reviews
  • Linda Kinney

    I am a retired Assistant Chief Executive and former Head of Education and Children's Services in Stirling Council. I have contributed nationally to early years and schools curriculum development in Scotland and have published two books on the importance of early education.

    The context of this story is about the parental breakup and the complex emotions that children experience. From the outset, the author speaks to the child in an engaging tone and lively storyline. She clearly understands how children experience emotions, and her narrative and guide help them to understand, process, and manage feelings that can at times be overwhelming. The device of the book is essentially a guide in the form of Angus the Angel. This guide is useful not only in the context of family breakups but would be useful in other situations such as moving home, bereavement and loss, or bullying. Children will readily relate to Angus. They will also understand the importance and sensitivity of animals, as the author as cleverly made this integral to the story. The book is ideal to be shared between the child and adult as it also provides informed explanations to adults facing complex issues. As well as being useful to parents, this book may also be of interest to teachers and carers working alongside children.

  • Yvonne Goldie (Retired Social Work Service Manager)

    Jenny Brown has written a heartwarming and beautifully illustrated tale that turns the tables on our complex adult world by allowing us to see it from a child’s point of view. It is ultimately a tale of love, but it also provides practical support for children going through difficult times.
    Ben’s parents are breaking up and Ben feels forgotten, ignored, but most of all, sad and scared. His best friend Kirsty is there for him and they share a love for a beautiful local woodland. His time with Kirsty in this lovely environment makes Ben very happy, but will his home life ever be the same again? Help arrives in the form of Angus the Angel. Angus can’t change Ben’s situation, but he can teach him the tools to cope. More problems arise for Ben when his beloved woodland comes under threat. This isn’t a job for an angel, but little miracles can happen in our world. In this instance, the answer unfolds when a big brown dog finds something very interesting and a grown-up, Ben’s teacher, actually listens.
    Although this book deals with specific issues of family relationships, the coping mechanisms Angus shares with Ben and Kirsty can help any one of us deal with the stressful situations that life throws our way.
    A great read for children and a powerful tool for adults who want to help.

  • Alistair Sinclair (Social Work Manager for 30+ years)

    This book may well appeal to children aged 7 to 8 plus years old.
    Advice is given to children with the assistance of Angus the Angel...in particular to children who are struggling with changing domestic circumstances.
    The focus is on human emotions, self-awareness, confidence, and in trusting others who find time to listen to and discuss ways of understanding situations.
    I consider that it would be of help if a trusted adult shares and discusses the content of this book with the child who is caught up in similar challenging situations.

  • Linda Kinney (Retired Assistant Chief Executive, Stirling Council.)

    The context of this story is about a parental breakup and the complex emotions that children experience. From the outset, the author speaks to the child in an engaging tone and lively storyline. She clearly understands how children experience emotions, and her narrative and guide help them to understand, process and manage feelings that can at times be overwhelming.
    The device of the book is essentially a guide in the form of Angus the Angel. This guide is useful not only in the context of family breakups but would be useful in other situations such as moving home, bereavement and loss, or bullying. Children will readily relate to Angus the Angel. They will also understand the importance of animals as the author has cleverly included both the importance and sensitivity of animals, particularly when children are dealing with challenging situations and emotions.
    The book is ideal to be shared between the child and the adult, as it also provides informed explanations to adults facing complex issues. As well as being useful to parents, this book may also be of interest to teachers and carers working alongside children.

  • Yvonne Goldie (Retired Social Work Service Manager)

    Jenny Brown has written a heartwarming and beautifully illustrated tale that turns the tables on our complex adult world by allowing us to see it from a child’s point of view. It is ultimately a tale of love, but it also provides practical support for children going through difficult times.
    Ben’s parents are breaking up and Ben feels forgotten, ignored, but most of all, sad and scared. His best friend Kirsty is there for him and they share a love for a beautiful local woodland. His time with Kirsty in this lovely environment makes Ben very happy, but will his home life ever be the same again? Help arrives in the form of Angus the Angel. Angus can’t change Ben’s situation, but he can teach him the tools to cope. More problems arise for Ben when his beloved woodland comes under threat. This isn’t a job for an angel, but little miracles can happen in our world. In this instance, the answer unfolds when a big brown dog finds something very interesting and a grown-up, Ben’s teacher, actually listens.
    Although this book deals with specific issues of family relationships, the coping mechanisms Angus shares with Ben and Kirsty can help any one of us deal with the stressful situations that life throws our way.
    A great read for children and a powerful tool for adults who want to help.

  • Alistair Sinclair (Social Work Manager for 30+ years)

    This book may well appeal to children aged 7 to 8 plus years old.
    Advice is given to children with the assistance of Angus the Angel...in particular to children who are struggling with changing domestic circumstances.
    The focus is on human emotions, self-awareness, confidence, and in trusting others who find time to listen to and discuss ways of understanding situations.
    I consider that it would be of help if a trusted adult shares and discusses the content of this book with the child who is caught up in similar challenging situations.

  • Maureen Annan ( A retired primary school teacher whose experience with young children was gained in various schools in Glasgow and the West of Scotland.)

    This is a real wee gem of a book! It represents the distillation of Jenny Brown’s lifetime dedication and wisdom in relation to helping and caring for vulnerable children.
    Stories are a marvelous way to help us with feelings and emotions that children especially can find hard to describe and deal with. The captivating characters of Ben, Kirsty, Molly, Dancer, and, of course, Angus the Angel form the basis of a delightful storyline that shows children that they are not alone in how they feel and, most importantly, that there are strategies that can help them with emotional conflicts and difficulties.
    This book is a wonderful vehicle for discussion and is full of positive, practical advice for children (and adults) to engage with and follow. Jenny has done a magnificent job of taking the complex topic of parents splitting up and delivering potential ways forward in an accessible, relatable, and enjoyable way!

  • Linda Kinney

    I am a retired Assistant Chief Executive and former Head of Education and Children's Services in Stirling Council. I have contributed nationally to early years and schools curriculum development in Scotland and have published two books on the importance of early education.

    The context of this story is about the parental breakup and the complex emotions that children experience. From the outset, the author speaks to the child in an engaging tone and lively storyline. She clearly understands how children experience emotions, and her narrative and guide help them to understand, process, and manage feelings that can at times be overwhelming. The device of the book is essentially a guide in the form of Angus the Angel. This guide is useful not only in the context of family breakups but would be useful in other situations such as moving home, bereavement and loss, or bullying. Children will readily relate to Angus. They will also understand the importance and sensitivity of animals, as the author as cleverly made this integral to the story. The book is ideal to be shared between the child and adult as it also provides informed explanations to adults facing complex issues. As well as being useful to parents, this book may also be of interest to teachers and carers working alongside children.

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